The Luttrells
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Copyright 2001 - 05 Glenn Luttrell
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THE LUTTRELL'S IN ENGLAND
Saint Andrew's Church in Irnham, Lincolnshire
Image Gallery
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c 1997Glenn Luttrell
The Tower Arch is the oldest part of the church, dating to about 1190 AD
c 1997 Glenn Luttrell
Interior of Saint Andrew's Church.
c 1997 Glenn Luttrell
"The Easter Sepulchre", probably built by Robert Luttrell, Rector of Irnham, in 1303.  8-1/2 ft. high & 7-1/2 ft. wide, consisting of three arched and recessed compartments between pinnacled buttesses.
c 1997 Glenn Luttrell
The "Andrew Luttrell Brass" is     8 ft. 9 in long by 2 ft 7 in wide.
The inscription at the bottom is Latin for "Here lies Andrew Luttrell, Knight, Lord of Irnham, who died on the 6th day of September, in the year of our Lord 1390, on whose soul may God have mercy".
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c 1997 Glenn Luttrell
Remembrances of 3 early Luttrells.  The "Andrew Luttrell Brass" in the foreground.  The "Easter Sepulchre" at upper left.  The "Founder's Tomb", Sir Geoffrey Luttrell, d. 1270, was buried (at right) in the South wall of the Chancel.
c. 1997 Glenn Luttrell
Southside of Saint Andrew's Church.
Sir Geoffrey Luttrell of Irnham, with his wife, Agnes Sutton and daughter-in-law, Beatrice le Scrope.  From The Luttrell Psalter, one of "the most famous manuscripts in the world on account of the numerous scenes of everyday life that mingle with the religious images on its pages".  Janet Backhouse 1989